Stained Glass in Fabric

Last week at Sunshine Rug Hooking, Linda Wilson gave a demonstration about hooking stained glass. Without my camera, I thought I’d missed my chance to share this technique, but as it happens, I wasn’t the only one to forget last week, and several people brought their stained glass work to share this week. So I wanted to show that work, and for those who may never have tried it, outline some basic steps to achieve the effect.

I have only hooked this one simple example, and you can see that I’ve never done the finishing. I always wanted to surround it with a real stained glass frame, but somehow that has never happened.DSCN0094

The day I got this pattern is one I’ll long remember. I had just started hooking, and my friend June Baker and I struck out one February day  to drive to Sheila Klugescheid’s house some miles away, to purchase hooking supplies. A raging snow storm blew up when we were on the road, and by the time we arrived, we had to struggle through about a foot of freshly fallen snow to get to her door. I found this pattern, and Shiela helped me choose the wool, then gave me the quickest lesson ever on how to hook stained glass. We couldn’t stay long for fear we would be completely snowed in.

Here’s the essence of her instructions for anyone who hasn’t tried it and might be interested….

Choosing wool:

-a dark colour for the leading (mine is deep taupe)

-spot dye or casserole dye for the background and details

Cutting wool:

-carefully keep the strips in the order in which they are cut and hook them in order (I used two sided tape affixed to cardboard to keep them in the right order)

Hooking

-Begin with the leading ( she suggested I cut it a size larger than the regular size,,,,in this case #4 for leading, #3 for the rest)

-Hook each section in straight lines (Shiela suggested sections touching go in opposite directions….although some people hook it all the same way)

….ANY ERRORS IN THIS INFORMATION ARE DUE TO MY FAULTY MEMORY….and are not the fault of Sheila!!!

Edie brought three examples to share today. Rather than a spot dye, she used a dip dye for the gowns.

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This little tree is mounted on actual stained glass.

 

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Jean made this piece for her mother.DSCN0088

She said she wasn’t pleased with it because she couldn’t keep the leading lines straight.

Her second piece didn’t start out as an underwater scene, but as she hooked the foliage, that’s what it suggested to her so that’s what it became. To keep the leading lines even in this one, she “tunnelled” the loops. DSCN0089

When she said this…someone in the group said, “I thought you weren’t supposed to do that! ” ….the reply?  ” You’re not….unless it creates the effect you’re after” How true for almost every “hooking rule” there is.

Kathy brought some examples of quilted and appliqué stained glass.DSCN0083

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What a wonderful way to decorate the house for Christmas. (such a talented lady)

Last week If I’d had my camera, I could have taken photos of beautiful  examples by several other people and included the extensive directions that Linda Wilson shared with the group . I apologize to them ( and especially Linda) for neglecting to do that.

Teresa has had a very productive fall. Along with a number of knitting projects, she has completed her shaded flowers piece,…..

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…..and a hit and miss rug for her bedroom,DSCN0092

Congratulations Teresa. Love them both.

Thanks for stopping by.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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My Hook History

Since I’ve been relating the chronology of my hooking, I thought I’d include the progression I’ve gone through in hooks. It reminds me very much of ‘scissors’. (This was one of my pet peeves as a grade one teacher…we give children blunt, dull scissors and try to teach them to cut well with a tool an adult wouldn’t think of using). We start cutting with these basic, non-sharp scissors, and move on as our skills develop to sharper and more accurate ones. Gradually demanding ones designing specifically for particular tasks. I have many pairs now, special ones for a variety of chores…ones for paper, embroidery, fabric, bent handled for hooking, kitchen scissors etc.

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The same thing has happened with my hooks. I started hooking with a general purpose Moshimer hook  ( hook number 1 in the picture) which  was included with my first pattern). The ‘scissors’ analogy breaks down here, because the Moshimer hook is an excellent tool unlike children’s scissors. I held it pencil fashion. (I was a teacher after all!) I used that for the first two phases of my hooking. Somehow I now have three Moshimer hooks, and I have no recollection of getting them….I think they must spontaniously reproduce!

After I started hooking with June Baker, I bought a pencil hook (which I have since given away…it was too thick for me and I never found it comfortable) , then got a finer one (hook number 2) which I really liked the feel of and used for quite some time.

As I started hooking more, I gradually began having difficulty with pain at the base of my thumb joint. I bought support gloves , but nothing really helped and I would have to stop hooking for days at a time to let the pain subside and the swelling go down. I mentioned this to a vendor at the ‘Annual’ in Midland a few years ago, and she sold me a hook designed to aid those with arthritis (hook number 3). It has a groove for the thumb to fit against, and she demonstrated it being palm held. It took me some time to convert myself to palming the hook…unless I concentrated, the hook would magically revert to a pencil hold. I found it less painful, but awkward with the shaft out straight, and I had to use a whole arm motion to hook. When I began reading Gene Shepherd’s blog each day, I quickly became aware of his dedication to the bent hook. I was moving to larger cuts, and needed a hook designed for them so I bought Gene’s 6mm bent hook. (number 4 in the picture) What a difference! I was converted. I no longer have pain, and the bent hook allows me to use a rolling motion to hook. The 6mm was a bit large for 5 and 6 cuts, so I purchased a lovely Irish bent hook from Rittermere’s, which I use for medium cuts. … hook number 5

Luise Bishop heard me talking one day about wishing I had a fine bent hook. She whipped out a little gadget (actually a small piece of wood with a hole drilled in it) inserted my fine Moshimer hook, and bent it backwards. … I had a  bent hook for fine cuts! (numbers 7 and 8) Hook number 6 had been in my tools box forever…no idea where it came from either. I had never used it because it was bent, and the handle isn’t particularly comfortable. I use it frequently now because the size fits between  the Irish and the Mosimers and it’s handy for adding a small piece for a special effect.

I now have this array of bent hooks which I use according to the cut and the backing. I’m a bent hook convert. (with a pain free wrist)

Dale’s rug

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June Baker gave me this pattern, and it is the first rug that I didn’t go and buy wool for. By now I had accumulated a small stash, and was enjoying dyeing wool, so I bought some natural Dorr wool, and a few colours of Pro Chem dyes. The predyed wool I had always purchased had been evenly coloured, but my background came out quite mottled. Disappointed at first, I soon realized I liked the effect. My taste was expanding. This was the last rug I hooked with #3 and #4 cuts and fine shaded flowers.

June taught me another valuable tip while I was hooking this rug. The petals on the yellow flower didn’t stand out clearly from one another, and she had me use a fine strand of black around the edges to delineate them….a strategy I have used many times since then. 

I gave this rug to my niece and namesake (Dale Elizabeth) for Christmas two years ago, and she sent me the photo (along with her beautifully pedicured toes lol) Thanks Dale! (Notice I didn’t mention my very trendy socks and sandals in the previous post)

My First Efforts at Dyeing

Up until this point, I had purchased all my wool ready dyed. When June suggested that she would teach me how to dye wool, I was excited about the challenge. By this time, June’s nearly 5 year hiatus from cancer had ended, and the dreaded disease had returned in her spine. She had been forced to give up teaching, but was always cheerful and optimistic. Her deep faith was a great solace to her throughout her illness.

She sat in her kitchen giving directions, while I dug through the cupboards getting her equipment, and making tea for us to share during the process. During several session she taught me how to do 6 value swatches, dip dyeing, and dyeing a background. She had me set up a 3 ring binder for my methods and recipes and  glue little swatches by each one. She provided me with an old porcelan  refridgerator crisper, and 8 square sided glass jars and my introduction to the world of wool dyeing was on its way.

`The first rug I made with wool I dyed myself, I gave to my niece for Christmas two years ago. I’ll talk about that rug next time.