My Third Beginning

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A group of teachers were sitting around the table in the staffroom one day, (I think it was the fall of 2004) when June Baker mentioned that she was a rug hooker. I quickly said that I hooked too, but hadn’t done any in years. She encouraged me to return to it and suggested we get together to hook.

June was one of that very special, rare breed of teacher…the professional supply teacher. (for me it would have been a fate worse than death, but she loved it)….and we loved her! You could always happily recover from illness at home knowing that your class was in marvelous hands when June took over. I had known her for years as a valued colleague, but now she became my hooking mentor and personal friend. We hooked together on weekends and holidays, and she dispensed countless tips and advice as we worked. I was interested in doing an oriental rug, so she took me to the home of a friend who had hooked many of them, to both see them and pick up tidbits of information.

That spring we went to Lindsey to the ‘Annual’, to view the rugs. I had decided to do another Rittermere pattern… Canadian Mosaic. Not a true oriental, but with many oriental influences. Ingrid Hieronimus of Ragg Tyme Studio was a vendor, and spent ages with me helping to choose the colour palette. The rug contains the flowers of each of the provinces and territories. It is 25″ x 46″,  and done in #3 and #4 cuts. I had always admired the beautiful even hooking of other hookers, and I think that the quality of Ingrid’s wool, plus the straight line hooking of the oriental style, allowed me, for the first time, to produce that kind of hooking. Again, Rittermere’s provided shading charts for the flowers, so there is very little of my own creativity in this rug.  I was, however, developing a hooking technique I was pleased with.

With the Peony rug not a suitable pattern to hang, I thought this rug might fit the bill. Alas! It is too small, and totally lost on the 18′ height of the stairwell. The wall there remains bare and Canadian Mosiac, although finished, remains stored in a drawer awaiting that special place to hang it.

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